Watching and Waiting

Matthew 25:13 – Watch therefore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour wherein the Son of man cometh.

In his great prophetic sermon, known as the Olivet Discourse, Jesus provides his disciples with parables intended to transform their present lifestyles.  His teachings in Matthew 24-25 were not mere possibilities to be considered, but realities to be anticipated.  The sense of urgency is thick, despite the unknown timeline, because the importance of Jesus’ prescribed action and attitude are vital truths with real consequences.  Jesus commands an action, “watch,” with a corresponding attitude, to wait.

Watching, in the context of end-of-days realities, is more than simple observance.  This action goes beyond watching the news or lamenting the waywardness of the world.  The term “watch” is frequently connected with the call for Christians to engage in persistent prayer for the salvation of souls (see Matthew 24:42, Colossians 4:2-6).  The command intensifies Jesus’ exhortation to pray; it urges us to remain vigilant and alert to petition God for all that agrees with God’s end-times plans.  Persistent prayer is the ingredient that propels our outreach mission.  We must pray that those who are in need of God’s salvation will be converted before Christ returns.  As the parables in this discourse reveal, there are many who will be unprepared fools at the return of Christ.  As we wait with joy and anticipation for Christ to return, as he certainly will, we must continue in prayer for the lost with a serious sense of urgency.

The one thing you cannot do in heaven is lead a soul to Christ.  Time is short.  We’re running out of time to have opportunities to share the Gospel with the unbelievers around us.  We need to pray more fervently now – more than ever – as we wait for the Lord to return.  Who will you pray for to trust Christ?  “Watch therefore….”

This post corresponds with the daily Bible reading challenges at www.libertybaptistnc.com and our Facebook group “Scripture Scholar Bible Study“.

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